Last edited by Voodooll
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

5 edition of Plough monday to hocktide found in the catalog.

Plough monday to hocktide

Doc Rowe

Plough monday to hocktide

an eductaion resource pack for the spring term on British traditions

by Doc Rowe

  • 300 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by English Folk Dance and Song Society in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Folklore -- Study and teaching (Elementary) -- Great Britain.,
  • Spring -- Great Britain.,
  • Great Britain -- Religious life and customs.,
  • Great Britain -- Social life and customs.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Doc Rowe and Carolyn Robson ; edited by Malcolm Taylor.
    SeriesEFDSS education resource pack -- no.3
    ContributionsRobson, Carolyn., Taylor, Malcolm., English Folk Dance and Song Society.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination64p. :
    Number of Pages64
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21883372M
    ISBN 100854181709
    OCLC/WorldCa41621380

      Dating back to the late 15th century, the first Monday after Epiphany marks the start of ploughing for spring sown crops and was once the traditional day of agricultural workers returning after the Christmas period. Historic documents however, tell of plough candles being lit in churches during January in the 13th century. Customs of the. Hocktide play, a folk play formerly given at Coventry, Eng., on Hock Tuesday (the second Tuesday after Easter).The play was suppressed at the Protestant Reformation because of disorders attendant on it but was revived for the entertainment of Queen Elizabeth I at the Kenilworth Revels in As described by one of her courtiers, the action of the play consisted mainly of a mock battle.

    Plough Monday Last updated Plough Monday, from George Walker's The Costumes of Yorkshire, Plough Monday is the traditional start of the English agricultural year. While local practices may vary, Plough Monday is generally the first Monday after Twelfth Day (Epiphany), 6 January. [1] [2] References to Plough Monday date back to the late 15th century. [2]. Easter and Hocktide. Written by Anne on 15th April Easter. The Anglo Saxons called April ēastre-monaþ. The Venerable Bede says in The Reckoning of Time that this month, ēastre, is the root of the word Easter. He further states that the month was named after .

    Plough Monday January 8 While the women always returned to their spinning on the Seventh of January, the men’s Back to Work day was a moveable one, falling on the Monday after Epiphany. This year, that happens to be the Eighth of January. Plough Monday is the traditional start of the English agricultural year. While local practices may vary, Plough Monday is generally the first Monday after Twelfth Day (Epiphany), 6 January. References to Plough Monday date back to the late 15th century. The day before Plough Monday is sometimes referred to as Plough Sunday.


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Plough monday to hocktide by Doc Rowe Download PDF EPUB FB2

From Plough Monday to Hocktide. This Beginner ’ s Guide covers the period of the year between Twelfth Night (6 January) and Hocktide (the second Tuesday after Easter). Beginning with the Plough Monday commotion at places like Haxey in Humberside and culminating in the Hocktide goings-on at Hungerford in Berkshire, this is an introduction to some special and sometimes anarchic events in the.

Hocktide. Hocktide is the period covering the Monday and Tuesday after Easter and was once the first major festival day after Lent. It was a time for sports and games as well as a day for the collection and payment of rents and dues. Nowadays it passes almost unnoticed. Hocktide (the second Tuesday after Easter).

Beginning with the Plough Monday commotion at places like Haxey in Humberside and culminating in the Hocktide goings-on at Hungerford in Berkshire, this is an introduction to some special and sometimes anarchic events in the British.

PLOUGH Monday, Candlemas and Hocktide, Rogation day, Midsummer and Lammas, hognells, apple wassails, boy bishops and lords of misrule: these days and festivities were once as important as Author: KEVIN SHARPE. "Plough Monday in Dorchester".

Dorset Life Magazine. Retrieved 27 January ^ Millington, Peter (). "Plough Monday Customs in England". Folk Play Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland.

Master Mummers. Retrieved 10 April ^ "Hone's Every-Day Book". The material is omitted from the Plough Monday entry in the Revised edition of Brand of. In this particular book, Plough Monday is discussed in the Pre-Lent section because of Twelfth Night kicking off pre-Lent.

Thank you for this great website. I visited. Plough is an award-winning international magazine of faith, culture, and society that appears weekly online and quarterly in print. We Plough monday to hocktide book publish a line of books, including literary nonfiction and fiction, children’s books, Christian books, and graphic novels.

Plough Sunday. The observance of Plough Sunday on the First Sunday of Epiphany goes back to Victorian times, but behind it there is a much older observance, associated with the first working day after the twelve days of Christmas, hence ‘Plough Monday’ in some places. Hocktide, Hock tide or Hoke Day is a very old term used to denote the Monday and Tuesday in the second week after Easter.

It was an English mediaeval festival; both the Tuesday and the preceding Monday were the er with Whitsuntide and the twelve days of Yuletide, the week following Easter marked the only vacations of the husbandman's year, during slack times in the cycle.

Procession of the Plough on Plough Monday, an engraving from The Book of Days: A Miscellany of Popular Antiquities by the Chambers Bros., Edinburgh, Large and small St Distaff’s Day gatherings of the fibre-based community were held nationwide on 7th January, with little work being done that day.

Books Quality books on faith, society, and the spiritual life since Plough offers books and ebooks for the Christian life: spiritual classics, literary fiction, devotionals, children’s books, biographies, memoirs, and sound biblical advice on relationships, marriage, parenting, and much more.

In13s 4d was gathered by women on ‘Hob Monday’ in the parish of St Mary-le-Hill, London, and, inwomen went ‘a-hocking’ in Chelsea and raised 45/.

The Lambeth Book, amongst other references to Hocktide payments, records that in, “ Item of Godman Rundell's wife, Godman Jackson's wife, and Godwife Tegg, for Hoxce Author: Jacqueline Durban.

Hocktide Binding Days, Hobtide, Hock Days, Hoke Days During the late Middle Ages English Easter celebrations continued long after Easter Sunday (see also Easter Week). They ended on the Monday and Tuesday following Low Sunday, or the second Monday and Tuesday after Easter.

These two days were known as Hocktide, Hobtide, the Hoke Days, or the Hock Days. The traditional beginning of the English agricultural year, Plough Monday has been observed since the 15th century on the first Monday after Twelfth Day (6 January), or Three Kings Day.

Marking the end of the holiday season, Plough Monday was a holiday and a feast day on the eve of returning to work and normal routines. Plough Monday and molly dancing Follow-up to previous items on molly dancing (See programmes 5 and 6) Of England's seasonal dance forms there is a group associated with Plough Monday.

Plough Monday. Monday after January 6th. Celebrated all day. Get your pudding on, don't get punked, and give them a penny already. The History. Back to Work. Plough Monday was celebrated throughout the United Kingdom on the Monday after January 6th, or the first Monday after the Twelfth Night of : Skyhorse Publishing.

A Method for Constructing a Low-Budget Bookbinding Plough for Conservators A plough is typically used by fine binders to trim a textblock to produce smooth, even edges.

A book is placed in the press of the plough and a blade is drawn perpendicular to the book along the length of the textblock, slicing through it a few sheets at a time.

The first Monday after Twelfth-day is called Plough Monday, and appears to have received that name because it was the first day after Christmas that husbandmen resumed the plough.

In some parts of the country, and especially in the north, they draw the plough. Plough Monday. William Hone, The Every Day Book, 2 Vols. London: William Tegg,Volume 1. The first Monday after Twelfth-day is called Plough Monday, and appears to have received that name because it was the first day after Christmas that husbandmen resumed the plough.

In some parts of the country, and especially in the north, they draw the plough in procession to the doors of. Plough Monday In past centuries the people of rural England observed the Twelve Days of Christmas with rest and recreation.

Daily tasks resumed after Epiphany. Women returned to their spinning the day after Epiphany, dubbed St. Distaff's Day. Men took up their ploughs again on the first Monday after Epiphany, which was called Plough Monday.

In earlier. Traditionally Plough Monday occurred on the first Monday after Twelfth Night (5th January) as this was when the Christmas festivities officially ended and serious work resumed. A key tool of the forthcoming labours was the plough and so this would be cleaned and sharpened ready for work.A traditional food for Plough Monday is “Plough Pudding,” a boiled suet pudding.

Ingredients: 1 pound suet (the hard white fat on the kidneys and loins of cattle, sheep, and other animals, used to make puddings and mincemeat), 1 1/4 pounds dried fruit, 6 eggs, 2 tablespoons flour, several pinches nutmeg, 1 glass of brandy.Hocktide Last updated Janu Hocktide, Hock tide or Hoke Day is a very old term used to denote the Monday and Tuesday in the second week after Easter.

[1] It was an English mediaeval festival; both the Tuesday and the preceding Monday were the er with Whitsuntide and the twelve days of Yuletide, the week following Easter marked the only vacations of the husbandman's.